A College and Klan Traditions

Scott Jaschik June 23, 2017 Inside Higher Education   Numerous colleges and universities in the last decade have studied and acknowledged the role of slavery in building and running their campuses, or financing the institutions. Other colleges have changed the names of buildings that honored people with ties to the Ku Klux Klan. Image of hazing at Wesleyan College in the 1950s, Photo of archival photo by Bob Andres / Atlanta Journal-Constitution // Inside Higher Ed, During that time, Wesleyan College was silent. The college in Macon, Ga., talks about its history quite a lot, pointing with pride to its Read More …

Nyack Library Workers Vote to Unionize

Kimberly Redmond July 25, 2017 Lohud   Nyack Library workers voted Monday night to unionize, making it among the small handful of Rockland County, New York libraries where employees are covered by unions. They will be joining the New York State United Teachers. Nyack Library workers voted Monday night to unionize, making it among the small handful of Rockland County libraries where employees are covered by unions. During a secret ballot election overseen by the National Labor Relations Board, staffers voted 33 to 7 in favor of establishing a union and affiliating with the New York State United Teachers, a Read More …

NAACP Issues Report Supporting Public Schools and Demands Charter Reforms

Something wonderful happened again at the NAACP convention. Despite enormous ed-reform and political pressure, the NAACP stood strong and issued a remarkable report in support of public schools that demands charter reform. In this WAPO Answersheet blog, I summarize the report. You can read it here. You can also read the full NAACP report here. Now it is time for us to thank the NAACP. Send a “thank you” note. We make it easy. Just click here. If you are not already a member, join the NAACP today.   Thank you for all that you do. Now please thank the friends of public education at Read More …

As Paperwork Goes Missing, Private Student Loan Debts May Be Wiped Away

As Paperwork Goes Missing, Private Student Loan Debts May Be Wiped Away    Stacy Cowley And Jessica Silver-Greenberg July 17, 2017 New York Times   Some of the problems playing out now in the $108 billion private student loan market are reminiscent of those that arose from the subprime mortgage crisis a decade ago, when billions of dollars in subprime mortgage loans were ruled uncollectible by courts because of missing or fake documentation. A City College of New York graduate last year. At least $5 billion in private student loans are at the heart of a legal dispute., Credit Spencer Read More …

Class Size Matters

Some important news to report. First the bad news: 1- The House Appropriations Committee voted yesterday to zero out and totally eliminate more than $2 billion in Title II funds, which are used in many schools to reduce class size, keep teachers on staff, and/or improve teacher quality. If the full House and Senate approve this budget it could mean the loss of more than 8,000 teaching positions nationwide, eliminating about 1,000 positions in NYC alone — leading to sharp increases in class size at many schools. Class sizes at most schools are already far too large and have not recovered since Read More …

Why Democrats Should Unite on a Charter School Moratorium

Why Democrats Should Unite on a Charter School Moratorium    Jeff Bryant July 6, 2017 Campaign for America’s Future   A moratorium on charter schools draws a bright line between a political regime intent on serving the privileged and a Democratic party that seeks to uphold labor and civil rights. Art exhibit opening at Concept Charter School. , U.S. Dept. of Education, Flickr / CC, Democrats know that success for their party relies on bringing labor and civil rights advocates together on key issues. Faced with disastrous Donald Trump, labor and civil rights advocates are rallying in common cause behind Read More …

Meeting the Needs of Homeless Youth: Public Schools Are Doing What Government Won’t Do Directly

Dr. Art McCoy, superintendent of schools in Jennings, Missouri, is a humble man. But when he speaks of his school district as “a lighthouse for informed practices that respond to the needs of homeless and low-income kids,” his pride is obvious. As a leader of the movement pushing public schools to address the overlapping emotional and material needs of impoverished students, Jennings is a model — stepping in to provide food, shelter, health care and consolation to students who need it. Not surprisingly, school districts throughout the US are looking to Jennings for inspiration, especially since federal and state governments Read More …

D.C. Charter Schools Get First Union

Kate McGee, June 16, 2017 via WAMU Teachers at Cesar Chavez Prep will be the first teachers at a charter school in the District to unionize. Middle school teachers at a charter school in Columbia Heights have voted to unionize, forming the first collective bargaining unit at a charter school in the district. The teachers at Cesar Chavez Prep Middle School voted 31-2 in favor of joining the American Federation of Teachers. “We’re excited for the opportunity to work alongside our school board and our principal to make a school that we’re really proud of into the envy of the Read More …

Maurice Cunningham: Dark Money Combines to Privatize Public Schools

The Diane Ravitch blog, June 21, 2017 Maurice Cunningham, a professor of political science at the University of Massachusetts, began investigating the millions of dollars pouring into the state during the referendum on charter schools last fall. He wondered why so many billionaires from other states wanted to expand the number of charter schools in Massachusetts. He continued his investigation after the election and has lifted the curtain on groups like Families for Excellent Schools, Stand for Children, and Educators4Excellence, and Leadership for Educational Excellence (a group connected to TFA). He began researching the intersection between philanthropy and dark money. Read More …

Pummeled by Student Debt, Let’s Fight for Education as a Public Good

By David Palumbo-Liu, Truthout | Op-Ed Forbes recently reported that there are more than 44 million borrowers with a combined $1.3 trillion in student loan debt, and the average student in the Class of 2016 owes $37,172 in student loans. Given the enormity of these figures, we now find more and more talk about “forgiving” student loans. In October, on the heels of Bernie Sanders’ vigorous primary campaign to make college tuition-free and debt-free, even Donald Trump opined: “Students should not be asked to pay more on the debt than they can afford … And the debt should not be Read More …