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Trump Tax Break Could Pay 20,000 Teachers

Ulrich Boser and Abel McDaniels, November 16, 2017, Center for American Progress   Under the tax plan currently before Congress, billionaires like U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos would save hundreds of millions of dollars. A new analysis by the Center for American Progress Action Fund suggests that the money used to give DeVos and her family just one of these tax breaks would be enough to pay more than 6,000 teachers. Similarly, the money used to give President Donald Trump and his family an enormous tax break would be enough to pay more than 20,000 teachers. CAPAF’s analysis underscores Read More …

All About Eva

The Nation, November 20-27, 2017   What does it mean for parents and their children to be “consumers” of education? The worst fate for a conservative is to be dependent on the state. The worst fate for a liberal is to be without opportunity. These two competing ideologies have informed a century of tinkering within American education. Conservatives have had occasional success chipping away at government spending, as President Trump seems poised to do. But it’s liberals like Success Academy founder and chief executive Eva Moskowitz who have managed a more inspired achievement: They’ve redefined the goals of educational policy. Read More …

The Network for Public Education Releases its Investigative Report on Charter Schools

The Network for Public Education releases Charters and Consequences, a 48 page report that is the result of investigations, visits and interviews over the course of a year. From San Diego, California to Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, NPE learned about the consequences of loosely regulated charter policy and the effects that charters are having on democratically controlled, true public schools. We have concluded that this unregulated, taxpayer-funded business model of education is a fiscal and educational disaster. Whatever the benefits it offers to the few, the overall negative consequences must be addressed. Read Charters and Consequenceshere and cut and paste this link to share it with Read More …

A ’60s Radical Reflects: Richard Ohmann describes two scenarios of what happened in universities and society, then and afterward

Richard Ohmann, November 13, 2017, Inside Higher Education. Activists from my cohort will soon mark 50th anniversaries of events that shook the world in 1968. We will recall, retell, reinterpret, revalue, reflect upon and draw lessons from those famous events, as well as from less famous ones that nonetheless changed alignments and life scripts. One such event for me and other scholars in language and literature was a 1968 uprising within the Modern Language Association. It derailed the stately procedures of that learned society, infused it with rebellious politics and enraged or inspired 30,000 members. For me and others in Read More …

Israeli Forces Target Palestinian Schools, Teachers in East Jerusalem and Hebron

Sheren Khalel,  November 8, 2017,  Mondoweiss. Israeli police forces entered Zahwat al-Quds school in occupied East Jerusalem on Monday, arresting the principal of the school as well as three teachers in front of students, before closing down the school and instructing parents to find alternative facilities for their children, according to Palestinian official media, Wafa. The events in East Jerusalem came one day after Israeli forces detained several teachers in the southern Hebron Hills on their walk to school, again in the presence of their students. Mondoweiss reached out to both the Israeli army about the Hebron incident and Israeli Read More …

When Unions Lead Education Reform

Rachel M. Cohen,  November 12, 2017,  In These Times. In the summer of 1995, Adam Urbanski, president of the Rochester Teachers Association, and Helen Bernstein, former president of the United Teachers of Los Angeles (UTLA), organized a group of union leaders from 21 locals across the country to discuss how teacher unions might mobilize their resources to strengthen and improve public education. The Teacher Union Reform Network (TURN) launched one year later, and over the next two decades, the voluntary network would convene several times per year to share ideas on how their American Federation of Teachers (AFT) and National Read More …

‘This is my country’: Cambridge University bans Arabic students travelling to Palestine amid fear of deportation by Israeli security

By Martin Coulter, London Evening Standard. The University of Cambridge has banned its Arabic students from studying in Palestinian territories as part of their year abroad. The decision comes after a number of Cambridge students travelling there were either interrogated or deported by Israeli security. The Palestinian territories of the West Bank and the Gaza Strip have been occupied by the Israeli state since the Six Day War of 1967 (although Israel officially disengaged from Gaza in 2005, its status as an occupied territory remains a matter of dispute in the international sphere). Five students, four female and one male, faced difficulties when landing Read More …

Graduate Students at the University of Chicago Become the Latest to Unionize

By Esha Indani. October 23, 2017, The Daily Pennsylvanian.     Graduate students at the University of Chicago became the latest to unionize. Graduate students at Penn faced similar opposition from administrators during their successful push to unionize last year. Graduate students at the University of Chicago voted to unionize earlier this week despite facing resistance from the university’s administrative staff. Following a two-day election that concluded on Oct. 18, UChicago became one of 12 academic institutions to host a Graduate Student Union after graduate students at the university voted to unionize by 1,103 votes to 479, according to the Read More …

A Game to Help Students Pay the Right Price for College

Article by Ron Lieber, The New York Times, September 29, 2017   Response by Richard Ohmann. As an example of how actual high school students might step into the college problematic, take Payback, an interactive simulation game, or, as the designers put it, “an immersive online experience that educates students to make wise decisions on how they’ll pay for college.”  It assumes that players have applied to a number of schools; have been adm itted to four institutions of varying types, from a community college to a private university that costs about $60,000 a year; and want to “understand the real Read More …

Teacher Employment May Have Weathered Recent Storms, But Schools Are Still Short 327,000 Public Educators

Elise Gould October 6, 2017 EPI.       With the September employment data in hand, we can look at the number of teachers who are starting work or going back to school this year. The number of teachers and education staff fell dramatically during the Great Recession and has failed to get anywhere near its prerecession level, let alone the level that would be required to keep up with an expanding student population. In addition to losses from the Great Recession, the pursuit of austerity at all levels of government has meant that public education jobs are still 128,000 Read More …