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Hunger on campus: Half of college students don’t get enough to eat

An estimated half of all college students are going hungry because they cannot afford to buy the food they need, according to a study by AFT member Sara Goldrick-Rab, who recently published an article about it in the New York Times. This problem extends far beyond the familiar ramen stories so many students have told over the years; students are now turning to food banks, struggling with homelessness and dropping out of school because they cannot afford to stay. The culprit? The “new economics of college,” with its high tuition and soaring student debt.

In Depth: Academe Tackles Targeted Harassment

The latest issue of Academe magazine comes at a timely moment, as it takes an in-depth look at the right-wing assault on academia. The issue includes a series of articles that specifically examine the targeted harassment of faculty. A profile of the AAUP chapter at Trinity College in Connecticut offers insight into how the newly formed chapter mobilized over the summer on behalf of Professor Johnny Williams after he was attacked on social media and subsequently suspended by the school’s administration. A group of sixty colleagues demanded that the administration rescind its decision, and the chapter’s executive committee issued a Read More …

NEH Teacher Summer Institute: The Civil Rights Movement: Grassroots Perspectives from 1940-1980.

Teaching for Change is proud to partner with a team of scholars, veterans, and educators from Duke University, SNCC Legacy Project, and Tougaloo College on an NEH Teacher Summer Institute: The Civil Rights Movement: Grassroots Perspectives from 1940-1980. Middle and high school teachers are invited to apply by March 1, 2018 for this 3-week summer institute with SNCC veterans, leading historians, and a powerful team of fellow teachers. The institute will take place at Duke University July 9-27. Participants will receive a stipend of $2,700.

Business Schools Now Teaching #MeToo, N.F.L. Protests and Trump

DAVID GELLES and CLAIRE CAIN MILLERDEC. 25, 2017.   NASHVILLE — Tim Vogus, a professor at Vanderbilt University’s business school, was stoking the debate in his classroom one day this fall, asking first-year M.B.A. students about one of the most successful, and controversial, companies of the day. On the syllabus was Uber, a case study in both sensational business success and rampant corporate misbehavior. “A toxic culture might be obvious when you think about Uber,” Professor Vogus said. “But I’m an old person. What is this whole ‘bro’ thing?” There were some awkward chuckles, and then hands started popping up. Read More …

Thousands of Black Students Leave Chicago for Other Segregated Districts

Kalyn Belsha, December 19, 2017, Chicago Reporter When Chicago Public Schools announced plans to close their neighborhood elementary school in March 2013, Lettrice Sanders and her children protested the proposal together. Sanders, the president of the local school council at Emmet on the city’s West Side, became a familiar face in the media.  “My momma, when she talked on the news, she was fierce,” her 16-year-old daughter, Brittany, recalls. Lettrice and her husband, Kenneth Sanders, didn’t finish high school. She wouldn’t let the closures disrupt their children’s education. But Emmet and 48 other elementary schools closed in an unprecedented decision for Chicago Read More …

Ten Awesome High School Protests that Defied the Trump Agenda in 2017

Dawson Barrett,  December 27, 2017, Truthout   These teenage rebels have the right idea, but they’ll need a lot more help in the New Year From the Women’s March to the airport occupations, the Trump era very quickly established itself as one of widespread protest and dissent. Despite having little political capital or economic power, teenagers, as they have been throughout US history, were on the front lines of much of it. On a wide range of issues, high schoolers across the United States opposed the Trump agenda this year, both directly and in principle. At the end of a Read More …

Student Debt Slavery: Bankrolling Financiers on the Backs of the Young

Ellen Brown, December 26, 2017, The Web of Debt Blog The advantages of slavery by debt over “chattel” slavery – ownership of humans as a property right – were set out in an infamous document called the Hazard Circular, reportedly circulated by British banking interests among their American banking counterparts during the American Civil War. It read in part: Slavery is likely to be abolished by the war power and chattel slavery destroyed. This, I and my European friends are glad of, for slavery is but the owning of labor and carries with it the care of the laborers, while the European plan, led by England, is that capital shall control labor by controlling wages. Slaves had to be housed, fed and Read More …

New Higher Education Bill Rolls Back Obama-Era Safeguards

ERICA L. GREEN, DEC. 12, 2017, The New York Times.   WASHINGTON — Congressional Republicans began work Tuesday on an extensive rewrite of the law that governs the nation’s system of higher education, seeking to dismantle landmark Obama administration regulations designed to protect students from predatory for-profit colleges and to repay the loans of those who earned worthless degrees from scam universities. But in its systematic effort to erase President Barack Obama’s fingerprints from higher education, the measure before the House Committee on Education and the Workforce could undermine bedrock elements that have guided university education for decades. One provision Read More …

Brown University Replacing Student Loans with Scholarships

Sarah Ruiz-Grossman, December 8, 2017,  Huffington Post. Brown University announced Thursday that it will no longer provide loans, only grants, in an effort to help students graduate with less debt. Starting in the fall of 2018, all students who receive financial aid from the Ivy League university will receive scholarships, which they don’t have to pay back. The goal is to make the university more affordable and accessible, particularly to middle-income families, said Brown spokesman Brian Clark. The students who will most likely benefit are those who previously may not have qualified for the university’s grants to low-income students from Read More …