We Must Cancel Everyone’s Student Debt, for the Economy’s Sake

Eric Levitz, February 9, 2018, New York Magazine Late last year, congressional Republicans passed a $1.5 trillion tax cut, which delivered the lion’s share of its benefits to the wealthy and corporations. The GOP did not justify this policy on the grounds that all corporate shareholders and trust-fund hipsters deserved to have their wealth increased. Rather, the party argued that, however one felt about making the rich richer, the tax cuts would ultimately benefit allAmericans by increasing economic growth and lowering unemployment. But what if we could have achieved those objectives, at roughly the same price, by forgoing tax cuts — and wiping Read More …

Vermont Teachers Say They Feel ‘Attacked’ by Policymakers

Tiffany Danitz Pache, February 7, 2018, VTDigger There are nearly 7,000 teachers in Vermont, 75 percent of whom are women. Nearly 90 percent of paraprofessionals in Vermont schools are women. And a majority of those surveyed recently don’t like what comes out of Montpelier. The results of the survey, which was commissioned by the Vermont NEA and conducted by Rebecca Kolins Givan and Pamela Whitefield, researchers at the Rutgers University School of Management and Labor Relations, are to be released Thursday. Titled “Women’s Work? Voices of Vermont Educators,” the Rutgers report paints a picture of a workforce that is predominantly Read More …

It’s Time to Pay the Tab for America’s College Athletes

Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, January 9, 2018, The Guardian In Thailand, bony little boys as young as nine and 10 are thrown into the boxing ring to punch each other into bloody submission while parents, relatives and other screaming adults bet on the outcome. Youth sports or child abuse? While most Americans feel outrage and revulsion at the idea, as a culture we are just as willing to toss our college-age kids into the gladiatorial arena to risk life and limb while we snack, guzzle and wager on the outcome. All while compensating the young athletes who are at risk with – Read More …

Connecticut Supreme Court Overturns Sweeping Education Ruling

ELIZABETH A. HARRISJAN. 18, 2018 It was a 12-year legal battle that began as a challenge to Connecticut’s education funding system and came to touch on issues ranging from graduation requirements to teacher evaluations. On Wednesday, it reached its likely conclusion when the State Supreme Court said Connecticut was fulfilling its constitutional obligation to its public school students. States across the country have faced legal challenges about how they spend money in schools and whether they spend enough on poor students, but this case, Connecticut Coalition for Justice in Education Funding v. Rell, took a remarkable turn in 2016 when Read More …

Student Debt Slavery II: Time to Level the Playing Field

Ellen Brown, January 5, 2018, The Web of Debt Blog “Students should not be asked to pay more on their debt than they can afford,” said Donald Trump on the presidential campaign trail in October 2016. “And the debt should not be an albatross around their necks for the rest of their lives.” But as Matt Taibbi points out in a December 15 article, a number of proposed federal changes will make it harder, not easier, for students to escape their debts, including wiping out some existing income-based repayment plans, harsher terms for graduate student loans, ending a program to Read More …

Guides for Fighting the Targeted Harassment of Faculty

What do you do if you or a fellow faculty member on your campus is subject to targeted online harassment? In the current political climate, this has become everyday reality in higher education, and the AAUP has developed some resources to help guide you and your colleagues when these situations do arise. All of the resources can be found on our One Faculty, One Resistance site. We’ve created a one-page guide to help you prepare to respond to cases of targeted harassment. By actively engaging with your administration to plan for cases of targeted harassment on campus and ensuring that Read More …

Hunger on campus: Half of college students don’t get enough to eat

An estimated half of all college students are going hungry because they cannot afford to buy the food they need, according to a study by AFT member Sara Goldrick-Rab, who recently published an article about it in the New York Times. This problem extends far beyond the familiar ramen stories so many students have told over the years; students are now turning to food banks, struggling with homelessness and dropping out of school because they cannot afford to stay. The culprit? The “new economics of college,” with its high tuition and soaring student debt.

In Depth: Academe Tackles Targeted Harassment

The latest issue of Academe magazine comes at a timely moment, as it takes an in-depth look at the right-wing assault on academia. The issue includes a series of articles that specifically examine the targeted harassment of faculty. A profile of the AAUP chapter at Trinity College in Connecticut offers insight into how the newly formed chapter mobilized over the summer on behalf of Professor Johnny Williams after he was attacked on social media and subsequently suspended by the school’s administration. A group of sixty colleagues demanded that the administration rescind its decision, and the chapter’s executive committee issued a Read More …

NEH Teacher Summer Institute: The Civil Rights Movement: Grassroots Perspectives from 1940-1980.

Teaching for Change is proud to partner with a team of scholars, veterans, and educators from Duke University, SNCC Legacy Project, and Tougaloo College on an NEH Teacher Summer Institute: The Civil Rights Movement: Grassroots Perspectives from 1940-1980. Middle and high school teachers are invited to apply by March 1, 2018 for this 3-week summer institute with SNCC veterans, leading historians, and a powerful team of fellow teachers. The institute will take place at Duke University July 9-27. Participants will receive a stipend of $2,700.